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Kalakala owner Steve Rodrigues walks on top of the vessel. The Art Deco vessel is now cleared by the Coast Guard and a state agency to make the move. Rodrigues says the boat and two tugs will begin the 42-hour trip to Neah Bay after the weather clears. The Kalakala, once a ferry operating between Seattle and Bremerton, has been languishing on Lake Union for more than four years as attempts to restore it foundered.The Kalakala, which means "flying bird" in native Chinook tongue, was built in Kirkland in the early 1930s on the hull of an older San Francisco Bay ferry that burned. It operated as a car and passenger ferry from 1935 until 1967, when it was pulled from the state ferry fleet. The following year, it was towed to Alaska to become a fish-processing station.It remained in Alaska for the next 30 years, sunk into the sand in a cove in Kodiak. It was dug out of the cove and returned to Seattle to a rousing welcome in 1998 by a band of Kalakala enthusiasts led by Seattle sculptor Peter Bevis. Restoration efforts have failed so far because of lack of money.
Kalakala owner Steve Rodrigues walks on top of the vessel. The Art Deco vessel is now cleared by the Coast Guard and a state agency to make the move. Rodrigues says the boat and two tugs will begin the 42-hour trip to Neah Bay after the weather clears. The Kalakala, once a ferry operating between Seattle and Bremerton, has been languishing on Lake Union for more than four years as attempts to restore it foundered.The Kalakala, which means "flying bird" in native Chinook tongue, was...
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